Not Jordan Peterson’s Carl Jung (A Reading From My New Book)

From Jung, After the Catastrophe: “Thanks to industrialization, large portions of the population were up-rooted and were herded together in large centres. This new form of existence—with its mass psychology and social dependence on the fluctuations of markets and wages—produced an individual who was unstable, insecure, and suggestible. He was aware that his life depended on boards of directors and captains of industry, and he supposed, rightly or wrongly, that they were chiefly motivated by financial interests. He knew that, no matter how conscientiously he worked, he could still fall a victim at any moment to economic changes which were utterly beyond his control. And there was nothing else for him to rely on.” … More Not Jordan Peterson’s Carl Jung (A Reading From My New Book)

Rousseau: A Young Man Should Learn a Trade

As a father of several children he more or less abandoned, Jean-Jacques Rousseau did not follow his advice, but perhaps his work Emile describes his ideal and not his reality. Rousseau begins to describe the education of a pre-teen and teenage Emile, he opines on why a boy should learn a manly practical trade like carpentry, how to teach him compassion, and how to deal with the strong urge to mate too early. … More Rousseau: A Young Man Should Learn a Trade